officialfrenchtoast:

confirm

(Source: constella)

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

sofapizza:

tastefullyoffensive:

Scottish Batman [pandyland]

ME PARENTS AH DEEAAAAAADDD

uglyadult:

you can tell by the way i walk im a womans man no time to talk

utentagen:

phoneus:

dude: way if we pees form buts

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the0notesking:

thatdudeemu:

Why she bussing it wide open for the ocean though?

Pop that pussy for Poseidon

(Source: omenta)

(Source: twerkgifs)

miikasaas:

The worst thing about getting into a new anime is tRYING TO LEARN EVERYBODY’S FUCKING NAME

policymic:

12 stunning portraits from Dr. Yaba Blay and Noelle Théard’s (1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race project

How do you define a racial identity? Can “blackness” be defined simply by a person’s skin tone, hair texture and facial features? Can we define it by the way someone walks or the way they talk? Can it be a product of someone’s cultural affinities, regardless of what she looks like?

These are the questions that Dr. Yaba Blay and photographer Noelle Théard encourage us to wrestle with in (1)ne Drop: Shifting the Lens on Race. Featuring the perspectives of 58 people who identify as part of the larger “racial, cultural, and social group generally referred to and known as Black,” the book combines candid memoirs and striking portraits to explore the complexities of Black identity and celebrate an individual’s right to self-identify.

(1)ne Drop's title derives from the “one-drop rule” — a (successful) attempt to define blackness in America as one drop, or at least 1/32, of Black ancestry for the economic, social, and political purposes of distinguishing a Black person from a White person. I say “successful,” because the one-drop rule still holds cultural weight today, especially with regard to how we value light and dark skin. For this reason, Dr. Blay aims to “challenge narrow yet popular perceptions of what Blackness is and what Blackness looks like.”

See more photos and the quotes from the above subjects

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tomlinsarse:

MY BROTHER TEXTED A RADIO STATION TO GIVE A SHOUTOUT AND THE RADIO STATION ACTUALLY READ IT OUT AND IT WAS “GREAT DAY AT THE BEACH WITH MY GIRL FROM HEYWOOD JABLOMI” AND THEY READ IT ALOUD AND THE ENTIRE RADIO WENT DEAD FOR A FEW SECONDS BECAUSE THEY REALIZED WHAT THEY SAID I’M LAUGHING SO FUCKING HARD

sidhwen:

starkmuffin:

#somewhere in the world jude law is crying

I think he’s moved on:

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#SHOULD’VE PUT A RING ON IT, RDJ

(Source: wtfsalommy)

dw:

when someone gives you directions but you go the wrong way

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santaurl:

NOTHIN SAYS KINKY AND WILd like. A MICKEY MOUSE MASK

(Source: dadpaws)